Crock Pot Entree Featured Soups Vegetarian

Six Marinara Uses

We all have our own special recipe for Marinara Sauce, I know I do.

Christmas Eve tradition: Mussels marinara
Christmas Eve tradition: Mussels marinara (Photo credit: mathewingram)

I want  to share a few other uses for Mariana that you may not have thought of.

 

1.)  Mussels Marinara

 

Bring 3 cups marinara to a simmer in a large skillet.  Add 4 pounds scrubbed and debearded mussels; cover and cook 5 minutes or until shells open.  Serve with crusty bread or over cooked spaghetti.

 

 

2.)  Marinara Poached Eggs

Bring 3 cups marinara and 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper to a simmer in a skillet.  Make 4 wells in marinara; crack 1 egg into each.  Cook, covered, 6 minutes or until desired degree of doneness.

Italian Style Seafood Soup

Italian Style Seafood Soup (Photo credit: nettsu)

 

 

3.) Italian Tomato Soup

 

Bring 3 cups of marinara and 2 cups unsalted chicken stock to a boil.  Stir in 1 cup cooked ditalini pasta.  At this point you can add canned beans of your choice or left over bits of seafood.  Top the soup with 1 ounce pecorino Romano cheese or topping of your choice.

 

 

 

Italian Sausage Pizza - Sugo AUD16.90

Italian Sausage Pizza – Sugo AUD16.90 (Photo credit: avlxyz)

 

4.) Sausage Pizza (Or any topping)

Top pizza dough with 3/4 cup marinara; 3 ounces cooked, crumbled hot Italian sausage (or toppings of your choice) and 2 ounces shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese.  Bake 450 degrees F, for 15 minutes.

 

 

 

5.)  Shrimp Vindaloo

 Bring 2 cups unsalted chicken stock, t teaspoons garam masala, 1 teaspoon hot paprika and 1 pound quartered red potatoes to a boil in a large saucepan.  Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 15 minutes.  Add 1 pound peeled and deveined shrimp; cover and cook for 6 minutes.  Serve over rice and garnish with cilantro.

 

Lamb Shanks in Red Wine Sauce

Lamb Shanks in Red Wine Sauce (Photo credit: tom_allan)

6.) Braised Lamb Shanks

 Brown 4 lam shanks in a Dutch oven; add 1/2 cup red wine, scraping pan to loosen browned bits.  Add 3 cups marinara; bring to a boil.  Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 2 hours.  Stir in a handful of coarsely chopped pitted kalamata olives in the last 10 minutes.

 

 

What?  You say you don’t have a great Marinara recipe?  Here is one you may enjoy.  I like it because it is made in the slow cooker!

 

Print

Six Marinara Uses

  • Yield: 12 1x
  • Category: Dinner
  • Cuisine: Italian

Description

A great Marinara sauce that can be used in a least 6 different recipes!


Scale

Ingredients

  • 3 Tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 cups chopped onion
  • 3/4 cup diced carrot
  • 1/2 cup diced celery
  • 1/4 cup minced garlic
  • 3 Tablespoons chopped fresh oregano
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons unsalted tomato paste
  • 1/2 cup dry red wine (such as Cabernet Sauvignon)
  • 5 1/2 pounds plum tomatoes, peeled and chopped
  • 3/4 cup chopped fresh basil
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper

Instructions

  1. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add oil; swirl to coat. Add onion and next 5 ingredients (thorough red pepper); saute 8 minutes. Add tomato paste; cook 2 minutes, stirring frequently. Add wine; cook 2 minutes or until liquid almost evaporates.
  2. Combine vegetable mixture and tomatoes in an electric slow cooker. Cover and cook on Low for 8 hours. Place 3 cups tomato mixture in a blender. Blend until smooth. Return tomato mixture to slow cooker. Add basil, salt, and black pepper. Cook, uncovered, on High for 30 minutes.
  3. Makes 12 1/2 cup servings

 

 

This article was adapted from Cooking Light Magazine, recipes by Deb Wise and Hannah Klinger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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About the author

Marlys @This and That

A Canadian transplant into USA with an African husband, you can see my adventures in internationally cooking over at This and That.

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