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Hops #KnowYourHerbsAndSpices | Daily Dish Magazine | Recipes | Travel | Crafts
Featured Herbs and Spices Home & Garden

Hops #KnowYourHerbsAndSpices

Photo by Paul Miller https://flic.kr/p/6RNrGa

Photo by Paul Miller https://flic.kr/p/6RNrGa

First thing most people think of when they hear the word, “hops” is beer. Hops is added to beer to create a certain amount of bitterness. Most people are on one side of the fence or the other when choosing how bitter or “hoppy” they like their beer.
Different types of yeast add different flavors including but not limited to citrus, spicy, minty and grassy.
It also makes a great natural preservative. Hops is added to beer to control bacteria and stimulate yeast.
You can find small amounts in natural deodorants!
Hops is a perennial climbing vine. Male and female flowers are located on separate plants. The cone-shaped fruits (known as strobiles) are collected in the fall and carefully dried. Female strobiles are used in beer and mead production.

This herb has also been used in pillows to create a calming effect. It is in the Cannabinaceae family which includes hemp and cannabis.

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About the author

Cindy's Recipes and Writings

As a professional cook, I love creating exciting new recipes on the job as well as at home. Assisting in teaching low-income families how to buy, store and prepare healthy food through Penn State’s alliance with Pennsylvania’s Supercupboard Program was very rewarding. During my 11 years with the Master Gardener program, I taught horticultural therapy to assisted living patients using healthful, fr
esh grown food as a focal point. . My hands-on programs and instruction helped hundreds of children and adults learn about where their food comes from and how important fresh food is for your body.
Currently I’m a cook at a college in Pennsylvania. We prepare everything we can from scratch, including our potato chips that tout the seasoning of the day!
Of course I write about food; it's in my blood!