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5 Garden Tips for Earth Day

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*Photo courtesy of Tesslaar Plants

Earth Day is just around the corner. Here are a few tips we can follow to help be Earth-friendly gardeners.

  • Use manure from plant or insect eating animals instead of synthetic fertilizers. Horse, chicken or bat (guano) manure breaks down easily. Horse manure needs to be composted to kill weed seeds and leach excess nitrogen that would burn plants. Use manure that has been composted for at least 2 years. If you live near a stable or horse farm you can ask and most likely get it for free. Free fertilizer! Chicken, rabbit and bat waste can be added directly to your garden.
  • Buy plants that are naturally disease resistant. You will not only have healthier plants but you will also do not need as many insecticides or fungicides.
  • Use rain water whenever possible. Install a rainbarrel or collect in a bucket covered with mesh to keep out mosquitoes.
  • Repurpose old containers into useful objects. Reuse smaller containers to start seeds or cuttings. Larger containers can house a small bulb grouping.
  • Join a community garden. Having friends help with the chores and share in the harvest can be very rewarding!

*Tesselaar Plants searches the world and introduces new plants for the home garden, landscape and home décor markets, undertaking extensive research and development of its varieties. The Tesselaar philosophy is to introduce exceptional plants while “making gardening easy” for everyone, so it makes its products as widely available as possible. Tesselaar believes the more gardeners there are, the better it is for everyone.

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About the author

Cindy's Recipes and Writings

As a professional cook, I love creating exciting new recipes on the job as well as at home. Assisting in teaching low-income families how to buy, store and prepare healthy food through Penn State’s alliance with Pennsylvania’s Supercupboard Program was very rewarding. During my 11 years with the Master Gardener program, I taught horticultural therapy to assisted living patients using healthful, fr
esh grown food as a focal point. . My hands-on programs and instruction helped hundreds of children and adults learn about where their food comes from and how important fresh food is for your body.
Currently I’m a cook at a college in Pennsylvania. We prepare everything we can from scratch, including our potato chips that tout the seasoning of the day!
Of course I write about food; it's in my blood!

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